Cooling Stations in Southern New Mexico

With triple-digit temperatures expected to return to Las Cruces’ weather forecast for several days this week, the City of Las Cruces will reactivate cooling stations beginning Wednesday, June 12, 2024. Cooling stations are expected to be open daily through Saturday this week to aid residents who need relief from the heat.

A cooling station is a place that offers temporary shelter from the heat for the elderly, other high-risk residents, and the public. Residents are encouraged to call cooling stations beforehand to verify they are open.

Cooling Stations will continue at designated City facilities through at least Tuesday afternoon this week.

With hot temperatures expected to remain in Las Cruces’ weather forecast, the City of Las Cruces will continue to utilize cooling stations through Tuesday, June 18, 2024.

A cooling station is a place that offers temporary shelter from the heat for the elderly, other high-risk residents, and the public. Residents are encouraged to call cooling stations beforehand to verify they are open.

The following cooling stations will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Today, June 17, and Tomorrow, June 18.

Frank O’Brien Papen Community Center, 304 W. Bell Ave. (575/528-2455).

Henry R. Benavidez Community Center,1045 McClure Road (575/541-2006).

Meerscheidt Recreation Center, 1600 E. Hadley Ave. (575/541-2563).

Munson Center, 975 S. Mesquite St. (575/541-3000).

Sage Café, 6121 Reynolds Drive (575/528-3151).

Thomas Branigan Memorial Library, 200 E. Picacho Ave. (575/528-4000).

Residents are reminded to drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check on relatives, neighbors, and pets. Also, extra precautions should be taken if they plan to work or spend time outside. When possible, strenuous activities should be rescheduled to early morning or evening hours.

Residents are urged to also be aware of the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat exhaustion symptoms include headaches, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting; weakness and moist skin; irritability or confusion; and an upset stomach. Heat stroke symptoms include dry, hot skin with no sweating; mental confusion or loss of consciousness; and seizures or convulsions. Heat stroke is an emergency and residents should call 911 if anyone is experiencing these symptoms.

People at a higher risk of heat-related illness include: infants and young children; older adults; people with disabilities; anyone with chronic heart or lung problems; overweight persons; those who work outdoors or in hot settings; users of some medications, especially some drugs for mental disorders, movement disorders, allergies, depression, and heart and circulatory problems; and isolated persons who won’t know when or how to cool off or call for help.

Wear lightweight and loose-fitting clothing when possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air-conditioned environments.

Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location as quickly as possible.

For hot weather tips, click here.

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